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Study Claims That Eating Three Chocolate Bars in a Month Can Reduce Your Risk of Heart Failure

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We all know that chocolate is unhealthy because of the excess fat and sugar, and as a result, we may steer clear of regular chocolate intake. However, a study has suggested that eating at least three chocolate bars every month can reduce our risk of heart failure

This study published by the European Society of Cardiology analyzed over half a million adults and determined that chocolate could deliver a direct impact on heart health. Individuals consuming up to three chocolate bars every month could reduce the risk of heart failure by up to 23%, compared to those not eating chocolate at all. 

The lead researcher Chayakrit Krittanawong believes that the ingredients of chocolate, otherwise known as flavonoids, are considered beneficial for a person’s health. They reduce inflammation and increase good cholesterol. Consuming flavonoids with a moderate amount of chocolate intake can also improve the levels of nitric acid found throughout the body. Nitric acid can increase blood flow while improving the circulation of blood

Dark chocolate, in particular, has a variety of health benefits such as relieving stress, boosting memory function, and improving mental health overall.  

While there are valid health benefits of chocolate, the research suggests moderation rather than overconsumption of sweets that you enjoy. In fact, exceeding your chocolate intake could lead to a 17% spike in the risk of heart failure due to the overload of saturated fats. Moderation, therefore, is a clear path to prevention of heart disease. 

To learn more, please visit https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/chocolate-bars-heart-failure-risk-reduced-health-study-new-york-a8511386.html

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Excessive Training Can Hinder Athletes’ Brains

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Researchers discovered that after multiple weeks of overtraining, the brain demonstrated decreased activity in areas about decision-making. Overworked athletes were found to be less willing to exert themselves for long-term rewards. This finding could potentially shed some perspective on diminished athlete performance when overworked, which is a phenomenon known as overtraining syndrome

The research study involved 37 male triathletes who participated in a training program. Half of the athletes continued with their original workouts, and the other half increased their training by 40%. Participants had their brains scanned, which revealed that there is less brain activity near the prefrontal cortex. They were also asked a series of questions regarding choosing instant gratification or a long-term reward. The researchers determined that overtrained athletes’ responses indicated a desire for instant gratification.

As an athlete increases his or her training, the brain reassesses goals and starts to prioritize them differently. When fatigue increases, the brain shifts from one goal to another as part of a built-in-mechanism. This could mean achieving a goal that will help the athlete recover rather than win. 

What do you think of overtraining, and have you experienced any cognitive deficits with it? Let us know in the comments below. 

Source: 

  1. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/09/26/764604968/too-much-training-can-tax-athletes-brains

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Remote Monitoring of Medical Condition can Enhance Patient Care

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The University of Manchester’s Connected Health team recently developed a smartphone app that would allow rheumatoid arthritis patients to input their symptoms. The data is embedded with the EHR and the results are presented graphically. Researchers discovered that when patients input their data on an app, they can see short and long term trends. Clinicians can then see flares in symptoms that may have been previously overlooked. They can then make more informed, data-driven decisions about the best course of treatment for patients. Mobile app platforms can also further support evidenced-based provider and patient communication.

What do you think the role of technology will be in patient care? Leave us a comment and let us know what you think. 

Source: 

  1. https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/daily-remote-monitoring-rheumatoid-arthritis-patients-can-improve-doctor-consultations

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Pfizer Introduces Robot to Better Analyze Patient Responses

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Pfizer has recently announced that it will begin a one-year pilot program with a robotics company called Catalia Health. Catalia Health has created a home-robot called Mabu. Mabu will help patients maintain their health and educate them about the use of their prescription drugs. The main goal of the one-year program is to help patients adjust to any significant health issue and to allow them to take their medication appropriately. 

Conversational AI allows Mabu to utilize voice interactions. This feature can help reveal a patient’s mood, treat symptoms, and record meaningful data. The information can then be related to medical staff who can assist the patient accordingly. Also, Mabu can predict a patient’s emotional state and deliver a personal response by using affective computing

After initial trials with Kaiser Permanente, 84% of patients are more likely to manage disease symptoms more effectively when they maintain regular interactions with the robot.

To learn more about this topic, please visit https://venturebeat.com/2019/09/12/pfizer-launches-pilot-with-home-robot-mabu-to-study-patient-response-to-ai/ 

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