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Getting Back Into Shape After Quarantine

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California has officially begun reopening businesses, including gyms, bars, and retail stores. The gym is the long-awaited reopening for those who can finally use athletic equipment rather than relying on bodyweight exercises to stay in shape.

The motivation to stay active during quarantine is quite difficult trying to use garages or bedrooms as a personal gym without any equipment or legroom available. As gyms reopen, it may be a little intimidating getting back into shape, and you may be wondering how to ease back into your gym routine safely.

Keep in mind that your level of progression is widely based on your total time off, and your level of fitness before it. If you start by placing a high demand on your body, you risk the possibility of injury and a quick regression backward. Being extremely sore the next day does not indicate a quality workout. Here is an outline to guide and help you ease back into your workout without losing motivation or risking injury.

1. Start with Flexibility Workouts

Your first progressive step should be to incorporate a couple of days of flexibility workouts to increase blood flow and circulation while supporting range of motion and joint mobility. Developing flexibility is one of the most overlooked protocols of fitness routines, and building these protocols early on will allow your body to properly readjust to the new demands that will be placed on it. Signing up or participating in a beginner yoga class or videos you can do at home to increase flexibility and build strength. Choose 10 to 15 stretches, performing each flexibility movement for up to one minute. 

2. Add Easy Cardio

The next step is integrating light cardiorespiratory workouts after a couple of stretching or yoga sessions. An excellent way to start is a brisk 20-minute outdoor walk that will revitalize your mind and get your body moving again. Other options you can include in your workout, such as low impact HIIT workout (high-intensity interval training) for beginners. Machines you can use at your gyms include treadmills, ellipticals, and stationary bikes are great indoor options. If you had a well-established fitness base before a month-long break, your first week might consist of light jogging instead of walking.

3. Start Strength Training

After your first week of flexibility and light cardio, start to incorporate strength workouts into your routine by trying gentle strength training workout for getting back into the gym. The time apart from the gym most likely involved a fair amount of sitting that causes weakness in your posterior chain, which refers to all the muscles on the backside of the body from your head down to your heels. These particular muscles are essential for basic everyday movement and keep your spine upright when at the desk. That is why incorporating exercises that improve your posture, develop core strength, and activate muscles throughout your glutes and hamstrings are essential. 

Exercises like squats, lunges, bridges, TRX hamstring curls, stability ball mobility, and core work will help activate these muscles. Bodyweight workouts are ideal for working these muscles and establish a safe transition back into your fitness regimen, and you can work within your fitness level. 

4. Begin your workout with a proper warm-up and end with a good cool-down

It is important to begin your workout with a proper warm-up that prepares your body for the increase in activity, and a cool-down helps your heart rate return to normal resting rate. Don’t jump into any physical activity without easing into it. Muscles that have not been accustomed to strenuous activity for a while, and will experience some form of DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness), which means you will be tight and achy for 24-72 hours after your workout. You may also experience this when you work out regularly but up to your intensity. With a proper cool-down session, you can help some of the soreness you could experience the day following your workout. 

5. And spend a few minutes stretching.

Stretching is an important dynamic when getting back into your fitness routine to help loosen those tight muscles before starting your workouts. After your workout, its good to release that muscle tension

6. Focus on your form

When you’re getting back into your regular routine, quality will always trump quantity. Maintaining proper form will help target and work your muscles without straining or overexerting yourself. Take your time to focus on your form, breathing, and control. This is extremely important because proper technique and form are crucial to help prevent injury

7. Don’t skip rest days!

Don’t jump into working out a six-days-a-week workout routine too soon. Recovery is a big part of being active. When you don’t take a day off, your body doesn’t get to take the necessary time to replenish your muscles. Rest days are vital to long-term wellness, and the lifestyle you are recreating for yourself now should consist of frequency. Promoting recovery is a good way to build habits of your workouts without leading to a sprain or strain delaying your workout and fitness routines. 

8. Listen to your body

Your body will let you know when it is working hard, but learning the difference between hurts-so-good and hurts-not-so-good will save you a trip to the doctor’s office. If something feels uncomfortable or causes you pain, stop doing whatever is causing your body to feel that way. There is a not-so-fine line between muscle discomfort from a good workout, and pain lets you know something’s not right. Be attentive to your body to help you progress through your workouts safely. 

Slowly easing your way to recreating your fitness regimen will help you stay consistent and achieve your fitness goals. It’s important to remember we are all on our fitness journey, so take your time and stay motivated!

Sources:

  1. https://wordofhealth.com/2020/05/05/gov-newsom-announces-california-to-begin-reopening-at-end-of-this-week/
  2. https://wordofhealth.com/2019/05/09/a-brief-guide-to-injury-prevention/
  3. https://www.shape.com/fitness/how-get-back-working-out
  4. https://www.self.com/story/heres-exactly-how-to-ease-back-into-working-out
  5. https://www.shape.com/fitness/tips/what-is-posterior-chain-exercises

Covid-19

Coronavirus: Sanitize or Disinfect?

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During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative that you wash your hands frequently or sanitizing them when soap and water are not available and cleaning commonly-touched-surfaces to keep yourself protected.

While sanitizers and disinfectants are commonly referred to as interchangeably, both products are different and should be used in separate circumstances.  

According to the CDC, cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting all have different definitions:

  • Cleaning eliminates germs, dirt, and other impurities from surfaces, but does not necessarily kill them.
  • Sanitizing decreases the number of germs on surfaces or objects by killing them or removing them—to a safe level, according to public health standards or requirements.
  • Disinfecting kills germs on objects or surfaces.

Diane Calello, MD, executive and medical director of New Jersey Poison Center and associate professor of emergency medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, states sanitizing does not kill everything. 

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines sanitizers as chemical products that can kill 99.9% of germs on hard surfaces. Again, disinfectants are more potent, killing 99.999% of germs on hard, non-porous surfaces or objects.

The difference comes down to that sanitizing solutions aren’t as potent as disinfecting solutions. Some products can be both sanitizers and disinfectants. Dr. Calello says concentrated bleach can be a disinfectant, but if it’s very diluted, it might be a sanitizer meaning it kills fewer bacteria and viruses.

Sanitize or Disinfect?

There are specific procedures for cleaning groceries, surfaces in your home like doorknobs, and your hands, and it’s crucial to get them right. When it comes to groceries, you don’t need to wipe them down with disinfectant wipes (or any other disinfectants) or a sanitizer. You can clean them using water, but no soap when you bring them to your home.

For highly-touched areas of your home like doorknobs, toilet handles, and even sinks, you want to save disinfectants for these areas. However, for countertops where surfaces are exposed to food preparation, its best to sanitize those so any chemical residue isn’t as powerful and potentially harmful.

As for your own hands, you should not use disinfecting wipes as it can be hazardous for your skin, according to Dr. Calello. She further adds that at the poison center, she works for has seen people’s adverse effects using disinfectants on their own bodies. She said there was a man who acquired powerful, industrial-use disinfectant wipes and developed a blistering rash.

Donald Ford, MD, family medicine doctor at Cleveland Clinic, states that you can wipe off surfaces but wash your hands. Due to the “good” bacteria that live on your skin, when you apply something that kills all the bacteria on your hands, you’re killing off some helpful and natural bacteria. 

Dr. Calello says there is a reason why we do not apply something that does not kill every organism like a hand sanitizer, which should contain 60% alcohol. However, it’s essential to remember that hand sanitizer is adequate if you’re out in public, but washing hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is preferred.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in people purchasing disinfectants and sanitizing products and knowing when to sanitize and disinfect surfaces or objects can help in practicing proper sanitation. 

Sources: 

  1. https://www.health.com/condition/infectious-diseases/coronavirus/sanitize-vs-disinfect
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/school/cleaning.htm
  3. https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/documents/ece_curriculumfinal.pdf
  4. https://www.njpies.org/administrative-staff/
  5. https://rutgershealth.org/provider/diane-calello
  6. https://www.health.com/condition/infectious-diseases/coronavirus/how-to-use-cleaning-chemicals-safely

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Covid-19

How to Properly Disinfect Every Type of Face Mask

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Face masks help limit the spread of COVID-19 by catching respiratory droplets that are released when people sneeze, cough, or talk. According to Dr. Steve Pergam, MPH, medical director of infection prevention at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, this is how the virus spreads person to person through these droplets.

When a person nearby inhales the droplets or the droplets land inside their mouth or nose, they could contract an infection with the virus. They could also likely contract the virus by touching a contaminated mask then touches their mouth or nose.  

Cleaning and sanitizing your mask is essential to limit the possibility of contracting the virus from contaminated surfaces, including face masks. 

This article will show how to safely disinfect common types of masks for reuse and handle medical-grade masks that cannot be easily cleaned outside of a medical setting.

Cloth Face Coverings

Debra Goff, PharmD, FIDSA, FCCP, an infectious diseases specialist and pharmacy professor at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, states that bandanas, cloth masks, neck gaiters, and scarves are masks that can be cleaned and reused.

If you plan to machine-wash your mask, first, wash your hands. Then remove the mask and do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth, Goff advises.

Place the mask directly into the washing machine then wash your hands immediately.

Goff recommends using your regular laundry detergent in addition to bleach and the warmest water recommended for that fabric type. Once the mask is washed, dry on high heat until it’s completely dry.

For hand-washing your mask, she suggests following the same method washing your hands before removing your face mask.

To disinfect your mask properly, soak it in a bleach solution containing four teaspoons of household bleach per each quart of water for 5 minutes.

Then soak the mask, and rinse thoroughly with water, and let the mask air-dry.

Goff states it’s best to clean cloth face masks after each use.

Medical-Grade Masks 

Kaiming Ye, Ph.D., professor and department chair of biomedical engineering and director of the Center of Biomanufacturing for Regenerative Medicine at Binghamton University, State University of New York, states that some masks, like N95 and surgical masks, are intended for single-use only.

This means the masks should be thrown away in the trash after wearing them for the average person.

Ye says these masks can be reused in professional settings, however, if properly sanitized. He says N95 masks can be disinfected by UVC germicidal irradiation or vapor phase hydrogen peroxide. 

However, there have been no tests performed on surgical mask disinfection or reuse as the demand is low, Ye notes. Goff suggests inspecting the mask when you take it off when you can’t replace your mask between each use.

If the face mask is dirty, torn, or saturated with moisture, she says you should discard it. Suppose it appears to be clean and intact. In that case, she recommends storing it in a clean paper bag or another breathable container between uses.

Ideally, however, they shouldn’t be reused.

Face Shields 

Since face shields open on the side, they don’t protect you from sneezes or coughs behind you. Face shields, however, protect your eyes.

Goff says face shields are often worn with a face mask for added protection. When it comes to cleaning face shields, first wipe down the inside using a clean cloth saturated with a neutral detergent solution or cleaner wipe.

Then wipe down the outside using a disinfectant wipe or clean cloth saturated with a disinfectant solution. Followed by wiping the outside of the face shield with clean water or alcohol to remove the residue.

Allow the face shield to air-dry, and finally, wash your hands when you’re done. Face masks are an essential way to prevent and limit the spread of COVID-19.

Make sure your face masks are cleaned or discarded after use by following these guidelines on how to keep every type of face mask sanitized.  Keep in mind that medical masks are not designed for reuse. Face shields may be used in addition to a face mask for more protection, and should also be cleaned between uses.

Sources: 

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover-guidance.html
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2020/p0714-americans-to-wear-masks.html
  3. https://www.seattlecca.org/providers/steven-a-pergam
  4. https://pharmacy.osu.edu/directory/debra-goff
  5. https://www.binghamton.edu/biomedical-engineering/people/profile.html?id=kye

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Covid-19

Abbott’s Latest COVID-19 Test Costs $5

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Abbott Labs has received emergency approval from the FDA for its rapid antigen test that detects COVID-19 in fifteen minutes. According to Brett Giroir, the United States Assistant Secretary for Health and the Department of Health and Human Services stated the test is a “game-changer.” 

The FDA’s emergency use authorization for Abbott’s BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag Card is approximately the size of a credit card. BinaxNOW will cost $5 and include a free mobile app that will let people who test negative display a temporary, date-stamped health pass renewed each time a new test is taken. 

The antigen test involves a nasal swab that uses the same type of technology as a flu test. Abbott announced it expects 50 million BinaxNOW tests a month produced by October.

Joseph Petrosino, a professor of virology at Baylor College of Medicine, expressed his enthusiasm for Abbott’s new COVID-19 test. He stated the test’s massive scale would allow millions of people to have access to quick and reliable COVID-19 testing. He added this would help get infectious people off the streets and into quarantine, limiting the virus’s spread.

The BinaxNOW COVID-19 Ag Card is the fourth antigen test to receive an emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration. 

The antigen test looks for pieces of the virus that are not as reliable as the traditional Polymerase chain reaction test, which looks for the virus’s genetic material. However, they are faster, less expensive, and less invasive. PCR tests have been beset by supply chain problems and back-ups at labs, which have delayed results and cause confusion among patients, doctors, and public health officials. 

 Sources: 

  1. https://www.abbott.com/BinaxNOW-Test-NAVICA-App.html
  2. https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/27/investing/abbott-labs-rapid-covid-test/index.html
  3. https://www.bcm.edu/people-search/joseph-petrosino-28634

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